About your Search

20130126
20130203
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it is carried out, i will resist it." you continued on and on talking about what a disaster the search would be, even to the point where it was clear the search was succeeding. in march 2008, you said, "the term " quagmire could apply. even as late as august 29, 2011 , in an interview with the financial times, you said, "i disagree with president obama and his decision to surge in iraq as i did with president bush on the surge in iraq ." do you stand by those comments, senator hagel? >> i stand by them because i made them. >> were you correct in your assessment? >> i would defer to the judgment of history. >> were you write are wrong about the search? >> i will explain why i've made those comments. >> i want to know whether you are right or wrong. i expect a direct answer. >> it we reviewed the record -- >> please answer the question -- were you correct or incorrect when you said that the search would be most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? correct o
think this speech given last night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since the vietnam. if it is carried out, i will resist it." the question continued on for months and months talking about what a disaster the surge would be even when it was clear the surge was succeeding. in march 2008, you said "the term quagmires could apply. some reject that term, but if that is not a quagmire, what is? even as late as august 29, 2011, in an interview with the "financial times" -- you said i disagree with president obama and his decision to surge in iraq as i did with president obama. do you stand by those comments? >> senator, i stand by them because i made them. >> were you right? where you write in your assessment? >> i would defer to the judgment of history to assert -- to sort that out. >> the committee deserves to know whether you are right or wrong about the search. >> i will explain why -- >> i want to know if you are right or wrong. it's a direct question. >> the surge assisted in the objective. >> will you please answer the questi
respected now than it was four years ago. i think she was very good at foreign policy. i think this will help her in 2016. host: we go next to jeff, from mississippi, the republican line. caller: good morning, how are you? i would rate her at about a 2. she got sworn in, she looked good, she flew around the world, and that was about it. there is nothing she has accomplished, and i do not think our allies are pleased with her. our enemies in the past believe in the -- the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. the only thing that bad people in this world understand is force. i do not think talking to them and making it nice with them is actually going to do anything. host: you made a statement about our allies and their perception. can you expand on that? behind wthe lead from strategy got two diplomats killed and three brave americans killed in libya. what responsibility has she taken for that? none. she said to the american people, what difference does it make how that information was disbursed to the people? >> you can see that hearing on a c-span.org and watche
with cutbacks to the u.s. stockpile as a means to draw russia into negotiations, foreign policy magazine reported, ahead of the unannounced discussions. the house subcommittee chairman mike rogers asks if they have assurances as to what is going on there. i would note that last year's defense authorization villepin -- bill calls for briefings on his discussions to the congress, the servant -- the armed services committee and subcommittee. it does not less than twice each year, the president or his designee will brief the committee on foreign relations and the committee on armed services about the dialogue between the u.s. and the russian federation on issues of limits or controls of nuclear arms, missile defense system, and long-range conventional strike systems. the deadline for that would be march 2 this year. my first question to you, if confirmed, will you honor that request as part of the mdaa? >> the request for the briefing? >> yes, the requirements for the briefing. will you keep congress advise on any discussions dealing with national defense and dialogue with russia on national
to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think to in really don't need today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propose and made the decision, i would do that and here is what they
with the mainstream of u.s. foreign and defense policy and also with president obama. chuck hagel believes we must preserve the american strength as a force for good in the world. he recognizing that protecting our interests requires strong allies and friends, as well as strong american leadership. third, chuck has the depth of experience and leadership skills required to handle this tough job. there is no shortage of security challenges around the world, as this committee knows and as you enumerated this morning, mr. chairman. a very large and impressive group of former cabinet officials and public servants from both sides of the aisle have said that they trust chuck hagel with this important responsibility. and i strongly, i strongly agree. fourth, on the fiscal side, i am will be athat chauck powerful advocate for a common- sense approach in this administration and on capitol hill regarding fiscal challenges to the defense budget. he understands that our defense capabilities are being threatened on two budget friends. first, sequestration, with its damaging, across the board, up from the budget
to be devoted to? but -- what is this 15 minutes going to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think -- you really don't need to in today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propos
of a foreign-policy think tank. at his confirmation hearing today, he had some back and forth with former colleagues, including senator john mccain. that exchange is about an hour and a half into the hearing. later, we will get your thoughts about the nomination and hearing on our phone lines at 11:00 p.m. eastern, 8:00 pacific. carl levin chairs the armed services committee and makes the opening statement. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> good morning, everybody. the committee meets today to consider the nomination of former senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. before i begin, i want to first welcome senator inhofe as the new ranking republican on our committee, succeeding senator mccain. senator mccain has been a great partner over the past six years, and i thank him for all the work he has done to get bills enacted, his leadership on a host of issues, his support for the work of this committee, and for always keeping our hearings likely. -- lively. senator inhofe has shown his strong commitmen
the president in the countries foreign policy debates -- mr. kerry in the state department, mr. hagel at the pentagon, and mr. mccain, will all derive a substantial part of their legitimacy from vietnam experiences. mr. mccain's relationship with mr. kerr it isy the striking tale of the lingering influence of the vietnam. more than a decade later, mccain traveled to massachusetts to campaign against mr. kerry. yet the pair worked so closely in the cause of reviving relations with vietnam that they became friends. when mr. kerry appeared at a senate confirmation hearing last week, he was introduced by mr. mccain, who praised his ' exemplary statesmanship.' mr. mccain's relationship with mr. hagel what has gone the opposite way. 'i admire him and consider is friendship to be a treasure of inestimable value to me,' mr. mccain said in 2001. by the time mr. mccain became the presidential candidate and to designate, the relationship had cooled. mr. hagel refused to endorse 'm, telling 'the new yorker' we so fundamentally disagree on our future course of our foreign policy and our role in th
security hawk. very knowledgeable about foreign policy. he is a, wish there were a better term for this, he's a social conservative. that term will have to do. and he's a hell of a guy. ladies and gentlemen, the new senator from texas, r, and capital r, rafael ted cruz. \[applause] >> thank you so much. jay has been a dear friend a long, long time. i told jay please -- you know this past week was a momentous week -- oh, i need a mike? hello, hello. >> as they said in the 20 70 campaign, help is on the way. \[laughter] so when the mike wasn't working i told all sorts of embarrassing secrets about jay nordlinger and i trust all of you got them in full lurid detail. this past week has been a momentous week. president obama was sworn in to a second term. i guess what made the news is beyonce apparently lip synced throughout the inaugural. not as widely reported was the fact that president obama did as well. who knew that his teleprompter could play music? we saw this week an ode to liberalism, unabashed, unapologetic, i have to say sitting there it occurred to me somewhere the sea must be risin
night by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it is carried out. i will resist it. and you talk about what disaster the search would become even to the point where it was clear the surge was succeeding. in 2008, you said you hear the term quagmire, which could apply. if that is not a quagmire, then what is approved even as late as august 29, 2011, in an interview -- 2011 -- in an interview with the financial times, you said i disagreed with the president, president obama, his decision on iraq as i did with president bush on the surge in iraq. do you stand by those comments? >> i stand by them because i made them. i will explain why. >> i want to know if you bore right or wrong. >> the search assisted in the objective, but if we review their record -- >> will you please into the question. where you correct when he said the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder since the a number of words you incorrect or correct? >> my reference -- and not argue not answering the question? the question was argue right
left a profoundly positive mark on american foreign policy, and you have done enormous but for all of us and for the country we served. we will miss you deeply, but none of us -- [applause] but none of us will ever forget your extraordinary leadership, and each of us will always be deeply proud to say that we served in hillary clinton's state department. [cheers and applause] and so now it's my great honor to introduce one last time, the 67 the secretary of state of the united states for america, hillary rodham clinton. [cheers and applause] >> oh. thank you. thank you. oh. well, just, all of you, the people i have been honored to serve and lead and work with over the last four years, is an incredible experience. when i came in to this building as secretary of state four years ago, and received such a warm welcome, i knew there was something really special about this place, and that having the honor to lead at the state department and usaid would be unique and singular, exciting and challenging. it has been all of those things and so much more. i cannot fully express how grateful i
of the president's state of the union address and how foreign and defense policy will be handled. then senator kirsten gillibrand discusses bipartisan safety legislation. later, former representative gabrielle giffords on gun violence. >> on thursday, a hearing on u.s. workers and retirement savings. live coverage from the senate health education and labor and pynchon's committee. that is live thursday at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> we are the best country in the world. what a marvelously stupid thing to say. of all the countries in the world, pretty good. what we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? and once we have to assert it all of this time? what does it mean to other people? american products go around the world, so you are observed by people in every corner of the world. and we teach them not to like us. gratuitously. >> randall robinson, taking your calls, e-mail, facebook comments, and tweets. sunday at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> president obama is set to deliver the state of the union. a discussion on how foreign policy and national security i
agree with those for bipartisan national leaders in the area of national security and foreign policy? >> yes. >> i wanted to take a few minutes to talk about some of the things we talked about in my office and some people are saying here she goes. the audit ability of the defense department. i know you want to hold people accountable. i don't think most americans realize as we face shrinking budgets and want to secure the pre-eminence of our military and not hollow out the spending at the defense department, that auditability is crucial. can you reassure me that auditability needs to happen no later than 2017? can you make a commitment that will be a priority, making sure as secretary panetta did at secretary gates did, that that's going to be an essential priority? >> as i told you, senator, i will make that commitment to this committee. >> then turning to contracting i have yet to have provided to me other than raw numbers we spent any data that indicates any major infrastructure rebuilding as part of a counterinsurgency works. there are many things that work in a counterinsurgency
is very good in foreign policy and i think she will be -- i think this will help her in 2016. host: we go next to jeff in tupelo, mississippi. republican line. caller: good morning. how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: she got sworn in, she looked good in the pictures, she flew around the world a little bit, and nothing that she has accomplished. i don't think our allies are real pleased with. our enemies in the past belief in the best predictor of -- i mean, future behavior is past behavior. the only thing that the real bad people in this world understand is force. i don't think talking to them and making nice-nice with them is going to do anything except emboldened them. host: you made a statement about our allies and their perception? could you expand on that? caller: well, the lead from behind strategy of this administration got two diplomats killed and three brave americans killed in libya. as far as her taking responsibility for that, what responsibility is it that she has actually taken? none she actually said to the american people what difference does it make now for that
is that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and that is a core issue that is affecting everything else? are you seeing it as a garnish on the salad? not essential. >> as a party, we need to have john and bill on that wing of the party. we also need those who acted and soggy world like we did -- and saw the world like we did in congress or we believed in a restrained foreign policy. that is part of the balance. did you go back and look at what william buckley said about iraq. he said it was not a conservative of venture. there's nothing conservative about believing that you're going to be able to change the way people live and think in other countries that do not have a democratic background. i think the bigger problem really has to duet the domestic side of things. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with its. the bigger problem from the bush era came that he was a big government republican. we had $155 billion surplus when he came in. when you that we had a $1 trillion deficit. our national debt doubled. we had a seven million-dollar
the democrats lost power in 1980, i became completely responsible on foreign policy, completely. when they were in power, they had to deal with the soviets. carter was weak, but when the soviets invaded afghanistan, he had the boycott, the olympic boycott. and he toughened up. one of the things he proposed was that the germans had wanted the americans to develop a neutron bomb. but instead, carter didn't want to do that. so he proposed to put in germany and in britain short range -- medium-range nuclear weapons as an answer to the soviets who had put medium weapons in eastern europe. that was a carter administration policy. reagan comes in in 1981 and democrats completely collapse. >> i was a speechwriter in 1980. i had nothing to do with him in 1984. but he and gary hart ran together to see who was the first to have been forced the nuclear freeze, which was the stupidest idea in the history of the nuclear age. i joined the new republican in 1981 on inauguration by the way. i wrote an editorial denouncing the freeze as an illusion and deception, which incidentally caused the most canceled subsc
we believed in a restrained foreign policy. so that's part of the balance. you know, you go back and you look at what william buckley said about iraq and he said it wasn't a conservative venture because there's nothing conservative about believing you're going to be able to change the way people live and think in other countries that don't have a democratic background. those were buckley's words, not mine. i think the bigger problem, though, really has to do on the domestic side of things because, you know, republicans i think as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from he was a big government republican. he came in, we had $155 billion surplus. when he left we had $1 trillion deficit. our national debt doubled. we had a $7 trillion medicare drug benefit plan that polls showed was a 50/50 proposition at best. george w. bush didn't veto a single appropriations bill. and we saw not only -- because when you say this and start going down the list, some republicans get defensive.
itsestions foreign policy record alongside his secretary of state hillary clinton. that's where we begin this morning with you. we want to hear your thoughts on the role of the u.s. on the world stage. give us a call this morning on the democratic line, the republican line, and the independent. 585-u're outside the u.s., 3883. you can reach us on facebook or twitter or e-mail. good monday morning to you. we want to start with the interview with president obama and secretary of state hillary clinton from last night that appeared on "60 minutes." here's how it played in a couple papers from around the country. here's the new york times headline -- and the culpeper star has -- i want to read you from the story that was in the hill newspaper this morning, the congressional newspaper here in washington. what we want to do now is take you to a clip from last night of that interview. here is president obama. [video clip] >> we helped to put together and lay the groundwork for liberating libya. when it comes to egypt, i think, had it not been for the leadership we showed, you might see a differe
paul ryan must be -- he must be studying up on foreign policy. but on the other end, people wrote that joe biden was more nervous because he did not know a fair bit about. -- foreign policy. with the incumbent maybe you have to go over a higher bar, and as the non-incumbent you just have to prove yourself. >> was there any question you could come up with, was the one that you could have passed either one of the candidates that may have put them off stride for a moment? >> all three of us think -- i wish i had asked this, or that way, but it, i did not try to do that, i just wanted to know what they knew. and there is this line that you don't want to look like a complete jerk. you don't want to ask that question in a way that makes you look like it is just too cute, or were you trying to throw them off, let's go back to bernie shaw. i was out there as a somewhat young reporter, a local tv reporter and i remember hearing that in los angeles, and it was stunning. in the end, talk about a debate that changes things. >> the s, if this wife was raped would he believe in the death penalt
at the national committee on american foreign policy and editor of the bimonthly journal "american foreign-policy interests." he was also on the senior advisory group of the u.s. africa command, since its creation. and was vice president for the position of the study of the middle east and africa. let's hear more from the commander of u.s. africa command at howard university last week. [video clip] >> our mission is to protect america and american interests from threats that may emerge from the continent of africa. we see this manifest itself in somalia with al-shabab. in the maghreb in the sahara, as putting out now in mali with al qaeda in the lands of the islamic maghreb. ansar al din as well. in nigeria, the existence of boko haram. these organizations all focused on undermining the governments of those countries and establishing their own regime of control outside of legitimate government control. i am very concerned about each of those individual entities such as al-shabab and the others, it is increasingly the coordination, the synchronization of efforts of those different organizations th
on israel yesterday. it is a huge foreign-policy issue for the. they happen to be in the middle of an environment that is unsettled and without clear paths forward. it is a core interest of the united states. again, it is a scenario where politicians feel strongly and american voters feel extremely strongly. there were some differences of opinion but got explored yesterday. again, that is part of the point of the hearing process -- of a confirmation progress -- process, getting into areas where people have concerns. host: one of the exchanges about israel, democrat from rhode island. >> interviews and speeches, i have always said i am a supporter of israel. in some cases, i have said a -- i am a strong supporter. i think it is in my book that we have a special relationship with israel. we always have. so i have never voted against israel ever in the 12 years i was in the senate. additional supplemental appropriations, the record is very clear. i might add, as long as we're on the subject, -- senator mel -- nelson may have a clear view of this, there have been a couple of recent
that are underrepresented is part of foreign policy. that is one of the things we see here at georgetown. as i walked up this flight of stairs, i pointed out that the jesuits were notaking it a little too far for having to work hard for knowledge. for those of you to do not know me already, i am coming from catholicism. that notion is of your taking the rigor and the hard work and incorporating values not just into the life in doing that in the policy arina. just like we do that in an academic arena. it allows traditions to come together. especially values of freedom, ule ofy, access to ro law. these are things that fuel us all in the conversation. it is wonderful. the more reports i do with the corporate sector, whether it is financial or manufacturing, whether it is folks to do business and management side, is that old disconnect that people say the corporate sector only cares about the bottom line. at the bottom line is the thing that need to be cared about and gets measured. what we have seen is that companies care about more than just the bottom line. the fact that deloitte is stepping up as someth
unrest in egypt and syria and how president obama's new foreign-policy team might approach these and other global hot spots. we will also have the president and co-founder of the migration pulp -- migration policy institute to discuss the 1986 law to control the flow of illegal immigrants in the country as well as provide a pathway to citizenship for those already in the country at the time. then we wrap up the program with the president and co- founder of women's rights rl
of the topics include foreign policy, and control, and women's abortion rights. it begins at noon eastern with cdc's "meet the press." at 1:00 p.m., but the ranking member of the foreign relations committees, senator john mccain, of addendas -- bob menendez. at two o'clock p.m. it is "fox news sunday." and assistant majority leader -- the state of the union follows at 3:00 p.m.. also a retired general and former cia director. administered by dianne feinstein and gov. bob macdonald of virginia and gov. scott walker of wisconsin. at 4:00, bob schieffer talks with senator dianne feinstein. the sending network talk shows this afternoon on c-span radio are brought to you by a public service by the network and c- span. the re-air begins -- you can listen to them all on c- span radio. nationwide on at some satellite radio channel 119. you can listen to on your smart phone or go online to c- spanradio.org >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how the use intelligence information, you learn how to leverage relationships. t
also to develop a foreign policy that reflects, again, the dynamics of the region as they really are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for the committee to finally do the work that it should have been doing for years. when you read the record and realize we have never done an authorization of the state department in the six years i have been here, we have never looked at how foreign aid has been spent. we have never done a top to bottom review. it is something people like you come to this position, look at as something that is healthy. there was mention of cost. i was disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of people i respect was money, money, money. this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spent or if that could have prevented what was happening -- what happened because we have never had an authorization. i want to close again by thanking you for your service, thanking you for your friendship, thanking you for your transparency, and i certainly look forward to your testimony. i know it will
for immigration reform. later, the president's state of the union address. how foreign and defense policy will be handled. and then former representative gabrielle giffords, her husband, mark kelly, and wayne lapierre testify on gun violence. massachusetts governor patrick appointed the chief of staff as the interim senate replacement for a senator john kerry, william cowan. you can see the entire event on our website at c-span.org. >> i am not running for office at any time now or in the future. the governor actually offered me this opportunity yesterday. i was aware that i was among the list of candidates, but as many of you know, i have focused since november on planning my return to the private sector, and that is what i had been focused on literally until that day. so -- >> what can possibly get done? >> there is much to be done. as i mentioned, i am not going by myself. we have one of the most experienced congressional caucuses that is in congress. i am going to work with them. i look forward to working with senator warren. good news for all of us is that i will have the benefit of
policies make sense. and there are very few foreign service officers, spread out all over the world, and they are your best line of defense against ad policy. -- bad policuy. host: we want to take our viewers to a live event at the brookings institute. it is the evolution of joints -- a force operations command and the pursuit of al qaeda in iraq. it is a conversation with general stanley mcchrystal, also featuring mike o'hanlon of brookings. thanks so much for joining us on "the washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] mf good morning, everyone. welcome to brookings. thanks for coming out. it is an unusual treat, even at a place where we have such amazing events, to have general stanley mcchrystal here today. i am mike o'hanlon, one of the members of the 21st century defense initiative. we are hosting this event with bruce riddell, who runs the -- first readout -- bruce riddell .- bruce ridedel, general mcchrystal build up an organization into what was the state-of-the-art capability that u
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)